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Reading, teaching  and writing books have been transformative experiences for Daniel Schwarz, Frederic J. Whiton Professor of English and Stephen H. Weiss Presidential Fellow. On September 27, he’ll be reading for a cause: the second annual Tompkins County Public Library Readathon.
As Schwarz writes on his Crowdrise fundraising page, he is participating in the Readathon “to support this essential community resource so that others can have the joy in reading and learning that I have been fortunate to have.”

Reading, teaching  and writing books have been transformative experiences for Daniel Schwarz, Frederic J. Whiton Professor of English and Stephen H. Weiss Presidential Fellow. On September 27, he’ll be reading for a cause: the second annual Tompkins County Public Library Readathon.

As Schwarz writes on his Crowdrise fundraising page, he is participating in the Readathon “to support this essential community resource so that others can have the joy in reading and learning that I have been fortunate to have.”

Benedict Anderson’s essays have established the tone and framework for understanding Thailand’s American Era, writes history professor Tamara Loos, M.A. ’94, Ph.D. ’99 in her introduction to a new collection of Anderson’s essays, “Exploration and Irony in Studies of Siam Over 40 Years.”

Anderson’s decision to study Thailand has painful roots: Originally a dedicated Indonesianist, in 1966 he co-authored an analysis of General Suharto’s bloody coup in Indonesia that was published as a book in 1971. The general responded by banning Anderson from Indonesia; it took 27 years and Suharto’s death before Anderson was allowed to return.

“But I got to be very fond of Thailand,” says Anderson, the Aaron L. Binenkorb Professor Emeritus of International Studies, Government and Asian Studies.

Saturn’s spectacular ring system may date back some 4.4 billion years to the time when the planet itself formed, new findings suggest. For the first time, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has measured the rate at which dust from outside the Saturn system is falling on the rings and polluting them. 
Cornell astronomer Phillip Nicholson says the findings might mean that Saturn’s rings are more ancient than some suspected. “If the pollution problem is not as severe, then the rings could last a lot longer before they turn black,” he says.

Saturn’s spectacular ring system may date back some 4.4 billion years to the time when the planet itself formed, new findings suggest. For the first time, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has measured the rate at which dust from outside the Saturn system is falling on the rings and polluting them. 

Cornell astronomer Phillip Nicholson says the findings might mean that Saturn’s rings are more ancient than some suspected. “If the pollution problem is not as severe, then the rings could last a lot longer before they turn black,” he says.

The College of Arts and Sciences welcomes this year’s Posse cohort (Posse 2, Class of 2018) to campus — and we welcome back Posse 1 (Class of 2017) as well.
“I’m absolutely ecstatic to be working with the group of extraordinary scholars in Posse 2,” says faculty advisor Derek Chang, associate professor of history and Asian American studies.

Here’s to a great year!

The College of Arts and Sciences welcomes this year’s Posse cohort (Posse 2, Class of 2018) to campus — and we welcome back Posse 1 (Class of 2017) as well.

“I’m absolutely ecstatic to be working with the group of extraordinary scholars in Posse 2,” says faculty advisor Derek Chang, associate professor of history and Asian American studies.

Here’s to a great year!

“French President Francois Hollande has called for a new cabinet – the second time in four months. Hollande’s approval rating is 17 percent; the lowest of any French sitting President. His austerity policies with their pro EU slant have put him in conflict with his own party.

“A right wing wave, fueled by the failed EU mandated austerity policies of the last five years, is beginning to sweep Europe. Marine Le Pen has been a beneficiary of this wave – but something more is going on in France where youth unemployment is as high as 25 percent.

“French politicians and public intellectuals need to shake themselves loose from their collective denial and start addressing the concerns of the disaffected and the unemployed young, as Marine Le Pen is currently doing. Otherwise, in 2017 or sooner, Madame President is a very real possibility.”

Mabel Berezin, professor of sociology at Cornell University, is an expert in European politics and the author of the book, “Illiberal Politics in Neoliberal Times: Cultures, Security and Populism in a New Europe.” 
Officials must consider both the physical and social dimensions of healing when responding to the West Africa Ebola epidemic, says anthropology professor Stacey Langwick in this Voice of America interview. 
Langwick is studying the Ebola crisis through the eyes of a medical anthropologist – someone, she says, who, is most interested in “behavior at the intersection of culture, humanity and biology.”

Officials must consider both the physical and social dimensions of healing when responding to the West Africa Ebola epidemic, says anthropology professor Stacey Langwick in this Voice of America interview

Langwick is studying the Ebola crisis through the eyes of a medical anthropologist – someone, she says, who, is most interested in “behavior at the intersection of culture, humanity and biology.”

This year’s M.H. Abrams Distinguished Visiting Professor in English has close ties to Abrams: Geoffrey Harpham has co-edited three editions of “A Glossary of Literary Terms” with Abrams, taking over as sole editor for the most recent edition. Harpham is also president and director of the National Humanities Center (NHC), which Abrams co-founded.
“Students this fall will have a unique opportunity to study with one of the country’s leading literary critics, as well as one of its staunchest and most eloquent advocates for the humanities,” says Roger Gilbert, professor and chair of English. “His seminars are certain to be both provocative and inspiring.”

This year’s M.H. Abrams Distinguished Visiting Professor in English has close ties to Abrams: Geoffrey Harpham has co-edited three editions of “A Glossary of Literary Terms” with Abrams, taking over as sole editor for the most recent edition. Harpham is also president and director of the National Humanities Center (NHC), which Abrams co-founded.

“Students this fall will have a unique opportunity to study with one of the country’s leading literary critics, as well as one of its staunchest and most eloquent advocates for the humanities,” says Roger Gilbert, professor and chair of English. “His seminars are certain to be both provocative and inspiring.”

Money can only buy you happiness if you spend it right. Previous research has shown that people value “experiences” like vacations and fancy meals more than they value material goods like cars and clothes. In a new study published in Psychological Science, Cornell psychologist Tom Gilovich finds that consumers actually enjoy waiting for experiences more, too.
“Our research is also important to society,” says Gilovich in this Washington Post story, “because it suggests that overall well-being can be advanced by providing an infrastructure that affords experiences – such as parks, trails, beaches – as much as it does material consumption.”

Money can only buy you happiness if you spend it right. Previous research has shown that people value “experiences” like vacations and fancy meals more than they value material goods like cars and clothes. In a new study published in Psychological Science, Cornell psychologist Tom Gilovich finds that consumers actually enjoy waiting for experiences more, too.

“Our research is also important to society,” says Gilovich in this Washington Post story, “because it suggests that overall well-being can be advanced by providing an infrastructure that affords experiences – such as parks, trails, beaches – as much as it does material consumption.”

Thirty-three Taiwanese artists explore the effects of globalization and the interconnected world in the new exhibition “Jie (Boundaries): Contemporary Art from Taiwan,” through Dec. 21 at the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art. Free and open to the public.

Adopting the philosophical connotations of the Chinese character jie (界, meaning “scope” and/or “boundary”), the exhibition reveals how human identity has become more fluid, variable, remixed and multidimensional, and less defined or determined by ethnicity, location or national allegiances.

Many of the artists grew up with, lived through and struggled against martial law (lifted in 1987), and address local and international politics and major social and environmental concerns, while younger generations show globalization affecting individual life experience, tinged with playfulness and anxiety.

The exhibition was co-organized by the National Taiwan Museum of Fine Arts and curated by An-yi Pan, associate professor of the history of art and visual studies, assisted by Ellen Avril, chief curator and curator of Asian art at the museum.

An artists’ forum and symposium on contemporary Taiwanese art Saturday, Sept. 6, will feature five of the artists in the exhibition, and presentations by Pan, art historians and scholars. Free registration; email eas8@cornell.edu or call 607-254-4642 by Aug. 29 to reserve a space.

Bienvenido a Cornell
Did you know that Cornell teaches more modern Asian languages (14) than any other university in the world? Or that there are 52 language programs located in eight departments of the College of Arts and Sciences?
Find out more about Cornell’s numerous language and international programs and discover the many options on campus and next week at the Language and International Studies Fair.
The fair is set for Monday, Aug. 25 from noon-2 p.m. on the first floor terrace of Uris Hall.
Language teachers and representatives from the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies, Cornell Abroad, the Language Resource Center, the Language Houses, international programs, and various area studies programs across the globe will be present and happy to answer questions.
They can speak about language courses, international experiences, funding opportunities, minor and major programs and study abroad. 


Find more information here. 

Bienvenido a Cornell

Did you know that Cornell teaches more modern Asian languages (14) than any other university in the world? Or that there are 52 language programs located in eight departments of the College of Arts and Sciences?

Find out more about Cornell’s numerous language and international programs and discover the many options on campus and next week at the Language and International Studies Fair.

The fair is set for Monday, Aug. 25 from noon-2 p.m. on the first floor terrace of Uris Hall.

Language teachers and representatives from the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies, Cornell Abroad, the Language Resource Center, the Language Houses, international programs, and various area studies programs across the globe will be present and happy to answer questions.

They can speak about language courses, international experiences, funding opportunities, minor and major programs and study abroad. 


Find more information here.